Digital Badge Update Week 2

Congratulations to everyone who has completed all ten tasks!

@liama_llama, @mrshannahunt, @jrsvensson, @EdgarKlusa, @nicmil75, @MartinAlpin, @FST_Placements, and @JenLLittle

Your digital badges are guaranteed and will be with you shortly (see below).

Congratulations, too, to the Week 1 completers:

@sarah_elsegood, @richardhayward7, @sarahalle88, @SparklyBooks, @annapajak_, @librarianklok, @ARU_Networking, and @ARU_ARITI

Halfway there (or more!).

 

Week 1 outstanding tasks:

  Day 1: Username Day 2: Joining in Day 3: Following People Day 4: @messages Day 5: Retweets
@holly_bopp Y Y 1 / 3
@Connect_to_Omair Y 2 / 3
Janet Sinclair-Hilton

 

Week 2 outstanding tasks:

Handle Day 6: Hashtags Day 7: Pictures Day 8: Managing People Day 9 :Managing Information Day 10: Evaluation
@sarah_elsegood
@richardhayward7 #WeNurses Y
@holly_bopp #Optometryhour
@Connect_to_Omair #internetofthings  Y Y Y Y
@sarahalle88 #wednesdaymotivation Y Y
@SparklyBooks #uklibchat Y
@annapajak_
@librarianklok #TuesdayMotivation Y
@ARU_Networking
@ARU_ARITI Y Y
@HiltoJanet Y Y Y

If you believe that you have completed any of the outstanding tasks, please contact me and let me know where I can find the missing posts (if you can provide me with a screenshot this will speed things up!)

 

Don’t Panic!

Don’t worry if you haven’t completed all the daily tasks yet – there’s still time!

All tasks must be completed by 5pm on Friday 31st March. This allows an additional two weeks for participants who are unable to finish the course while it ran.

Digital Badges will be issued automatically by Wednesday 5th April. If you do not receive a Digital Badge but think you are entitled to one, please contact Mark Warnes.

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Eleventh Day of #ARU10Dot: What next?

Yes, I know this is 10 Days of Twitter, but I thought it would be useful to offer some suggestions about how you can continue to use Twitter in an academic context. An intriguing question is whether or not anything academically meaningful can be conveyed in 140 characters, when most academic publications are thousands of words long.

Here are some ideas as to how it can:

Tweet about new publications

These can be journal articles, blogs, website updates, etc. It is a good idea to have access to an online version of the full publication, or to an abstract, so that the tweet can point somewhere for followers to get more information. By providing the link via certain shortening services (e.g. bit.ly) you can gauge interaction with your publications.

Tweet about relevant new developments

You could inform people about new government legislation, relevant publications or activities by other organisations in your research area. This could aid your own work in several ways such as by increasing your collaborative network, raising interest in your research area and perhaps leading to greater funding opportunities.

Use Hashtags

Hashtags are a great way to make your area of interest, and the materials you produce more visible. You should not hold back about creating your own hashtags if no relevant ones exist, but remember what we covered on Day 6.

‘Crowd Sourcing’

Twitter is a great way of providing opportunities for ‘crowd sourcing’ you work, getting people to engage in and help you with your work is often possible. Some researchers have been successful in using Twitter to get actual funding.

New Audiences

Twitter is a very good medium for helping you to reach out to non-academic audiences, such as governmental organisation, business, NGOs etc.

Impact

Twitter can be used to as a metric for Impact, by collecting data on activity related to your project or work. Useful data to collect includes changes in:

  • The number of followers you have
  • The names of those who could be useful for future collaboration
  • Invitations to write a publication or speak at events, which have come via Twitter
  • Number of visits to your own publications via Twitter
  • The number of Impressions your activity has generated

Publicity

Twitter is a great way to raise awareness of events your Organisation or Department may be hosting. You can then LiveChat the event to further raise awareness. Several of my colleagues monitor Twitter chat from events they can’t physically attend.

Communication

Twitter is of course a communication medium, but it can actually be of great use in keeping the members of the sub-groups within your organisation up to date with your activities. You can also use Twitter to communicate more easily with students, researchers and part-time staff who may not always be kept up to date with activities through normal channels.

Twitter and Blogging

These two forms of social media work very well together. It is a good idea to keep your blogs managed in such a way that the essential content of each blog can easily be tweeted.

The Future

Now you’ve learned to use Twitter as part of the #ARU10DoT community, it would be great if we can sustain the conversations and the community around social media and academia at Anglia Ruskin.

The @AngliaLTA account for Anglia Learning & Teaching draws together information and conversations around learning, teaching and assessment at Anglia Ruskin. Keep following for information about activities and events on this topic within the University and beyond. Do message us to ask questions, engage in conversations or draw our attention to anything you think we should know about!

There is a hashtag, #AngliaLTA, associated with the @AngliaLTA account for tweets about learning, teaching and assessment, and we hope you’ll use it to find useful information and also to tag your own tweets for others to find. You might want to save it as a search or set up a column in your Tweetdeck or Hootsuite platform to keep track of it.

I’ll still be around on Twitter as @markwarnes2 of course, tweeting about a wide range of issues to do with Higher Education.

I look forward to interacting with you in future – do keep in touch!

 

 

Many thanks to @dr_tobe and @mdleast for letting me adapt their text for this post.

Tenth Day of #ARU10DoT: The Past and the Future

Twitter is ephemeral. Tweets are short, throwaway observations, which capture the present moment, flow past quickly and are succeeded by more recent and relevant ones. We’ve looked at a way to favourite tweets, and to bookmark the URLs they may contain, but once you’ve done this, why would you want to keep a tweet? Why would you want to tweet in advance, rather than in the moment?

The Past

You can scroll through your last few thousand tweets or so (which might cover quite a span of time, depending on how prolific you are) but searching and looking at hashtags won’t take you back very far, only a few days. And yet… although finding past tweets might be difficult, they can come back to haunt you. If you want to find a tweet, it might be quite tricky, and yet if you want a tweet to disappear, someone may be able to dig it up!

Deleting Tweets

Let’s look first at deleting. You can delete your own tweets, by hovering over it and using the option that appears below next to ‘reply’, ‘retweet’, etc. If you make a mistake in a tweet, it might be less confusing to send another tweet with a correction rather than delete one that people may already have seen. If you tweet something you shouldn’t… well, don’t! However, you can’t delete someone else’s tweets, so if they’ve already retweeted you, taken a screenshot, or archived the tweet using some of the options below, it might be too late!

But remember this when deleting tweets…

But what if you want to keep tweets, either your own or someone else’s? Why might you want to do this?

  • Perhaps a discussion on Twitter helped you to think something through, and you want to keep the discussion so you can work it up into a blog post, or integrate it into a chapter or article later
  • Maybe there was a good twitter ‘backchannel’ of live-tweeting at a conference or other event, which you want to preserve either for yourself or others
  • Perhaps you want to preserve a selection of good advice or observations on a topic, when you ‘crowdsourced’ – asked for suggestions on Twitter and got some great responses. You might want to keep and share them with others.

Tweet URLs

You can save a link to individual tweets. Each tweet has its own URL. To find this, click on the down arrow and select ‘Copy link to Tweet’ from the list of options.URL of TweetThis will open a new dialogue box containing the URL for the tweet.LinkAlternatively you can click on the tweet which will open a new tab/window for that single tweet which contains the URL. You can copy and paste this URL, or save it, bookmark it, embed it in a website, or email it to people.17-02-day-10-03However, this might only be a convenient way to present tweets in some circumstances.

Your Twitter Archive

If you want a copy of all your tweets, then Twitter can send you an archive of everything you’ve tweeted. Click on the gear icon, and select ‘Settings’. In your ‘Account’ page, scroll down to the bottom where you will see an option to download your archive:

ArchiveStorify

However, one of the nicest ways to keep tweets, especially for others, is a third party application called Storify. Storify is the tool which makes a narrative overview of tweets and other social media by linking to content on the web, including tweets, websites and blogs, Facebook posts, YouTube videos, or photos on Flickr. You can search for content, drag and drop it into a linear narrative, add some comments to contextualise it, and publish it on the web or share the URL. You are linking to the original source, rather than taking the content, so it doesn’t breach copyright. It automatically notifies people whose content you have used in this way, so if they object to your use, you can edit out their material (all the material visible to Storify is publically visible anyway).

Storify is a really nice way to create and share a summary of tweets and other online material around an event or discussion, such as a conference, blog or livechat. Storify is the tool I used to create a summary of the first week of #ARU10DoT on Day Five.

The Future

And what about future tweets?

You can schedule tweets to send themselves automatically later on. You can’t do this from Twitter itself, but will need to use one of the additional apps mentioned in Days Eight and Nine, so you may wish to leave this topic for later if you want to consolidate the basics first.

Although Twitter is a medium which captures the moment, there are several reasons why you might want to schedule tweets for a later time.

  • If your following contains people in a different time zone who are most likely to be online in the middle of the night, and you want to catch their attention
  • If you have collected a lot of links you want to share, but don’t want to overwhelm your followers with lots of tweets at once
  • If you want to tweet repeated information, updates or reminders, perhaps about an event you’re organising, a blog or article you’ve written or a deadline for a job or funding opportunity, without having to remember to do it (I’ve made use of this frequently throughout this programme!)
  • If you’re away or busy but want to keep some presence on Twitter

You can schedule tweets from both Tweetdeck and Hootsuite. To schedule a tweet in Tweetdeck, for example, write a tweet as normal, and then click on ‘Schedule Tweet’. This brings up a small calendar, where you can choose the time and date when you want your tweet to be sent.17-02-day-10-05

If you don’t use Tweetdeck or Hootsuite, there are other apps which only schedule tweets. You might try, for example, Futuretweets or Twuffer or also Buffer (which works for other social media too). You can sign in with Twitter (or Facebook, or LinkedIn), and it will ask you for permission to access your Twitter feed. Once signed in, it will ask you what you want to share. Type in a tweet, and click ‘schedule’ or ‘buffer’. You will want to go to the ‘Schedule’ tab and set the time zone, and the day and time you want to tweet!

There’s quite a bit there to play with! Well, that’s the last of our Ten Days of Twitter, but don’t worry if you’re still catching up – so are others, and the conversation will be continuing on #ARU10DoT for quite some time, I hope! You might like to keep an eye on the programme hashtag and support academic colleagues as they learn how to use Twitter. I hope you’ve found the programme useful, and thanks for joining in! Keep tweeting!


Digital Badge

See the Digital Badges tab at the top of the screen for more information.

Activity:  Today’s Digital Badge activity is to complete the Satisfaction Survey.

OR (if you think that’s just too cheeky!)

Post a 100-word reflective summary of your experience of the course and whether it has had any impact on your practice.


But…

If you’ve experimented with Twitter and decided it’s not for you, then I hope we’ve helped you come to a better understanding of what it is, and a well informed decision on whether to use it or not. If you now want to delete your account, it’s easy to do so. We encourage you to keep your digital footprint tidy!

Ninth Day of #ARU10DoT: Managing Information

If you’re choosing who to follow effectively, then your Twitter feed should be full of interesting tweets and links to webpages etc. which you might want to follow up on. It’s easy to get overwhelmed, lose track of it all, miss things and mislay things!

Twitter itself has a few features which can help you stay on top of all the information.

Likes

If you see a tweet which interests you and which you’d like to come back to later, you can ‘like’ it and it will be stored for you to return to. To ‘like’, simply click on the Heart icon:Likes

When you want to look at your liked tweets, you will see them marked in your Twitter stream, but it’s easier to see them all together. If you click on the top tab with the profile icon and ‘Me’ you will see your ‘likes’ as well as your tweets, followers and following. Click on ‘Likes’ to view. When you like a tweet, the person who tweeted it is notified, which may help to gain you an extra follower, but it also gives them feedback on what others are finding useful.Likes

If you set up a Tweetdeck account yesterday, you can also add a column for your ‘liked’ tweets.

Search

You can also search for tweets, by username, hashtag or just by a keyword. The search box is at the top of the screen in the right hand corner. You can also organise the search results by top (most popular) topics, all results, or limit the results just to the people you follow. Once you have searched, a small ‘settings’ cog icon will appear next to the ‘search’ box (not the main cog icon at the top right of the screen!). If this is a search you might repeat regularly, click on this, and you can save the search so you don’t need to keep performing it – useful if you’re following a hastagged discussion. You could also perform an advanced search using this icon- you can narrow down the tweets you’re looking for by word or by the person sending or receiving it, or by location.

Trending

In the left hand column, Twitter will also show you what hashtags are popular at the moment. This may or may not be of much use to you! You can narrow the trends down by location, by clicking on ‘Change’ in this box, but if you are networking at a national or international level, this may not be very helpful.

Curated Timeline Content

Whereas traditionally, Tweets appeared in your timeline in reverse chronological order (i.e. with the most recent at the top), Twitter now decides which Tweets you will find most important. Twitter will select ‘Tweets you are likely to care about most will show up first in your timeline. We choose them based on accounts you interact with most, Tweets you engage with, and much more’.

Should you wish to disable this feature, you can do so by removing the ‘tick’ in the appropriate option in Settings:Curated timeline

MomentsMoments

Moments are, according to Twitter, the best stories on Twitter. In essence they are headlines grouped by theme: Today | News | Sports | Entertainment | Fun.

However, the Moments are a blend of trending hashtags plus sponsored content from selected ‘partners’ (including Bleacher Report, Buzzfeed, Entertainment Weekly, Fox News, Getty Images, Mashable, MLB, NASA, New York Times, Vogue and the Washington Post).

Extras

If you’re keen to explore further, you might look at the following tips, or you might return to them later on, when you’ve been using Twitter for a while:

Third party applications

If you’re feeling more adventurous again today, here are a few more third party apps which will help you curate all the links which people are tweeting about.

Tweetdeck

If you explored Tweetdeck yesterday, you may not have realised that not only can you add columns for lists of people, you can also add columns to follow hashtags. Click on ‘Add column’, and then choose ‘Search’. If you perform a search for a hashtag, you can add a new column to your Tweetdeck which will now display all the tweets using that hashtag, whether you follow the people using it or not. This might be useful if you are following a conference hashtag or chat such as #AngliaLTA but don’t want to follow all of the people tweeting with this hashtag.

Pocket

Pocket is an application which saves any webpage for you to look at in more detail later, when you have time. It is a bookmarking tool – if you find a webpage via a link in Twitter (or anywhere else), you can save it to Pocket, and then return to it and the other things you’ve saved later on. Pocket is a web browser based service, meaning you can access it from anywhere and any device or computer. To create an account, you’ll simply need an email address, username and password. On your desktop computer, you can download and install it into your browser, so you can simply hit a button in your toolbar to save a webpage (how to install it depends on which browser you prefer to use, but Pocket will take you through the steps – it’s easy!). When you use Twitter in a browser with Pocket installed (and also if you have installed the Pocket app on your smartphone or iPad), then a ‘Pocket’ option appears alongside the other options of ‘reply’, ‘retweet’, ‘favourite’ etc. when you hover over a tweet containing a link, so you can save it right from the tweet instead of having to open the link and add it to Pocket from there. You can also access Pocket on the web, if you’re on a computer which isn’t yours, or where you can’t install it into the browser.

Flipboard

If you use a smartphone or tablet such as an iPhone, iPad or Android device, you could download an app which curates content from your Twitter feed, such as Flipboard. Once you have downloaded the app, you can connect it with your Twitter account (or other social media) and it will draw in the links that people share with you and display them for you. To find out more about Flipboard, and how to set up an account, see instructions in its ‘support’ section.

News.me

If you don’t have a tablet device, you can set up an account with news.me, which will deliver the main stories shared by the people you follow on Twitter in an email. To sign up, you’ll need to add your email address, and then connect it with your Twitter (or Facebook) account by clicking on the request to authorise this. That’s it!

Paper.li

Paper.li is an application which curates content from social media streams which you use (in this case, Twitter, but also Facebook, Google+ etc.). It then presents the links it’s found in an easy to read magazine form. You can share this with others (and it will tweet automatically on your behalf, but it is not recommended that you ‘spam’ your followers in this way!) but you can just use it to pick up the links you might have missed on Twitter by adding Twitter as a source.

You can create an account and log in to Paper.li using either Twitter or Facebook. Use Twitter in this instance, of course! After that, follow the instructions given by Paper.li.

So there are a range of ways to stay on top of all the information that’s being shared with you by the people you follow.


Digital Badge

See the Digital Badges tab at the top of the screen for more information.

Activity: Today’s Digital Badge activity is to choose one of the applications we have discussed above, and experiment with it –  post below to let us know your thoughts and findings in the comments section.

Eighth Day of #ARU10DoT: Managing People

Over the last seven days, you may have found that as you continue to use Twitter, you come across more and more interesting people to follow, and your following also grows exponentially. Keeping track of them all can be a challenge, and sometimes you will want to focus on certain groups of them over others, or check in on some people only sporadically. This is hard to do in the undifferentiated stream of tweets on your Twitter feed, where they are all mixed in together. Fortunately, there are ways to split up your Twitter stream and group the people you follow into separate streams, so you can keep an eye on their tweets as it suits you.

You might want to group the people you follow into any of the types that we looked at in Day Three. Some examples might be

  • Colleagues or services at your institution
  • Colleagues and peers across the country/world in a particular field
  • Professional or funding bodies
  • News accounts
  • Social, personal or fun accounts

Twitter lists

Twitter has a feature which allows you to make lists of people – and you need not follow all of them to add them to a list. These lists can be private, so only you can see them, or they might be public so you can share them with others. I created such a list for the participants of this course on Day Two, so you could find each other on Day Three. You might create such a list for the benefit of others, for example, to bring together the attendees at a workshop or conference, students on a particular programme or module, or the top accounts on a particular topic which you recommend other people should follow. You can share a list by giving people the URL of the list page, or let them view the lists you’ve created on your profile, where they can subscribe to your lists too.

To create a list on Twitter, go to the Gear Wheel icon at the top right of the page. Select ‘Lists’, and you will see a page which will contain any lists you will make. Click on ‘Create list’, and you will be asked to name your new list and add a brief description. This description will be very helpful if you now choose to make the list public, so others can find and subscribe to it. You will now be invited to search for people to add to your list. You can also add them later, by clicking on their @name and going to their profile. If you click on the three vertical dots you will see a menu containing the option ‘add or remove from lists’.

To view your lists, or those of other people, you can simply go to ‘lists’ on your ‘Me’ tab (one of the options across the top), and see only the tweets from the people in that list.16-12-day-08-02Block, Report and Mute

While we’re on the topic of managing people, you can also block or report people, for example, if you are followed by a spam account or someone you don’t want following you. My Block List (accessed through Settings) includes a variety of unwanted or undesirable accounts.

As I’m not a fan of gambling, for example, I have blocked Bet365, 888Poker and Newmarket Racecourse. Some of the accounts appear to be spambots as it is highly unlikely that young girls who live in the US and don’t speak English are a) real and/or b) interested in anything I have to say! Others I block for political reasons. I have not actively sought out accounts to block – these are all accounts that followed me for reasons best known to themselves.

16-12-day-08-03Extras

If you’re keen to explore further, you might look at the following tips, or you might return to them later on, when you’ve been using Twitter for a while:

Third Party Apps

The beauty of Twitter is in its simplicity as a platform. However, sometimes you need a bit more functionality. There are some third party applications created by other companies as add-ons to Twitter, to help you out with some of the things about Twitter which you may find a bit overwhelming. Some of them will need to be integrated with your Twitter account to drawn information from them, and to do this, you will need to grant them access to your account (you can undo this again from your Twitter account settings).

You might want a more convenient way to view different aspects of your Twitter stream, or even add in updates from other platforms such as Facebook or LinkedIn together with Twitter, so your whole social media stream is visible in one place. To do this, you can use one of the third party applications that were developed to make Twitter easier to use.

Tweetdeck

Tweetdeck is owned by Twitter, and is a good way to manage more than one account, if you have more than one (for personal and professional use, or perhaps an individual one and an official one on behalf of an institution). I am using Tweetdeck to tweet from @ARU10DoT, @markwarnes2 and also @AngliaLTA at the moment, without having to log out of one account and into another – and it’s easy to get confused and tweet from the wrong one! However, you can also use Tweetdeck to split your Twitter stream into columns divided by people. It will import any lists you have made on Twitter too.

You will need to create an account, with an email address and password. Once you have set up an account, you can connect your Twitter account(s). You can use it as a web-based application to access from anywhere, or you can download the Tweetdeck app to your computer (there is no app for smartphones or tablets). Tweetdeck is organised into a number of columns, and gives you a number of columns automatically, such as your timeline, your own tweets or your @mentions (tweets that mention you), and you can add new columns for the lists you create. You can also create new lists in Tweetdeck. Click on ‘add column’, and choose ‘lists’ (or any other column you want to add!).

You can do everything we’ve covered in Twitter on Tweetdeck too, including shortening URLs. Tweetdeck also makes some other things in Twitter a little bit easier. For example, when you retweet, it will ask you if you simply want to retweet or if you want to edit the tweet, as we discussed in Day 6. On Twitter, you need to copy and paste the tweet if you want to edit it, which can be fiddly; this does it automatically.

Hootsuite

Hootsuite is similar application to Tweetdeck, but it allows you also to import other social media accounts such as Facebook, and it is also available as an app for mobile devices. You can sign up using Facebook, or if you prefer to keep Facebook separate from your professional social media use, you can sign up with an email address, name and password. It will then ask you to add your chosen social network accounts. You can then add streams of content similarly as in Tweetdeck, and tabs for the different social networks. Hootsuite has a quick start guide to help you set up your account.

The other bonus of tools like Tweetdeck and Hootsuite is that you don’t see the advertising ‘promoted tweets’ from companies you don’t follow!


Digital Badge

See the Digital Badges tab at the top of the screen for more information.

Activity: Today’s Digital Badge activity is to create a list and post the link in the comments section (e.g. https://twitter.com/MarkWarnes2/lists/famous-people). You might want to try making a list of your colleagues on Twitter, or perhaps one for the professional and funding bodies you follow.

Seventh Day of #ARU10DoT: Pictures and Videos

I’m sure that, by now, you will have noticed that your Twitter feed contains a lot more than just text! While Twitter is primarily text based, a picture, as they say, paints a thousand words. Adding an image to text makes it much more effective, and moving images are even more eye-catching.

By tweeting pictures you can share the atmosphere at a conference, or a keynote speaker, or a poster that you think your followers will find interesting, or the results of a group activity in a seminar, or the cover of your latest book!

Adding media to your tweets is very straightforward but is slightly different depending on whether you are using a PC or an app on a mobile device. There are restrictions, of course – pictures must be in a certain format (i.e. GIF, JPG or PNG) and cannot be bigger than 5Mb, and videos can only be a maximum of 30 seconds long.

Mobile

The Twitter app is available for both iOS and Android devices and once you’ve installed it simply tap to create a tweet in the usual way.Day 07 - 01 - iPhone MediaYou can choose to select a picture or video from your library, but you will need to give Twitter permission to access your pictures.

Alternatively you can choose to take a new picture or record a video from inside the app. To do this, simply tap on the blue camera icon. However, you need to give the app permission to access your camera and, if you want to record video, your microphone as well.

Day 07 - 02 - iPad PermissionOnce you have added your chosen media, add a comment in the ‘What’s happening’ box and tweet.

PC-Based

Accessing Twitter via a PC restricts you to selecting from your media library:Day 07 - 03 - PC MEDIASimply click on the Media button, browse to your picture, and pick the one you want to share.

Third-party Applications

Many apps allow sharing to Twitter and other social media platforms. The image sharing app, Instagram, for example, offers the ability to share content to five external apps, including Twitter:Day 07 - 04 - InstagramVideo Autoplay

The default setting for video tweets on Twitter is to play them automatically as you scroll through your feed. If you want to change this, you can do so in Settings:Day 07 - 05 - VIDEO AUTOPLAYWhile you might not feel the need to disable video autoplay on a PC, you might have different ideas about mobile devices, where the default setting is to autoplay videos using either Wi-Fi or mobile data, whichever is available.

Day 07 - 06 - IPHONE SETTINGS FOR VIDEO AUTOPLAYDay 07 - 07 - IPHONE SETTINGS FOR VIDEO AUTOPLAY 02Video content can eat into your mobile data so, if your package only has a limited data allowance, you might want to switch to ‘Use Wi-Fi only’ or even disable autoplay videos completely.


Digital Badge

See the Digital Badges tab at the top of the screen for more information.

Activity: Today’s Digital Badge activity is to tweet a picture. Take a photograph of your desk, your building, yourself, anything you like, and share it with your followers. If you need inspiration then look at the pictures that the people you follow have tweeted. Just make sure you use the #ARU10DoT hashtag so we can call see it. And, if you’re feeling adventurous, there’s always video…

 

Digital Badge Update

Hi all!

Keeping track of who has completed the daily tasks has been much more complex than I had predicted!

I have produced a table showing what I have received from you all for last week’s activities:

Day 1: Username Day 2: Joining in Day 3: Following People Day 4: @messages Day 5: Retweets
@nicmil75

Y

@royalsociety
@Science_Council
@ChemicalScience

Y

Y

@sarah_elsegood

Y

@RobGMacfarlane
@scholastic_rat
@LibGoddess

Y

Y

@richardhayward7

Y

@RacePhil
@trishgreenhalgh
@PhDForum

Y

Y

@SparklyBooks

Y

@orkneylibrary
@innocent
@ARULibrary

Y

Y

@liama_llama

Y

@ARULibrary
@OnePerfectShot
@FakeLibStats

Y

Y

@ARU_ARITI

Y

@cyberawaregov
@futurecitiescat
@BBCRoryCJ

Y

2 / 3

@mrshannahunt

Y

@_skiesimunder
@Vicky_gazette
@esxLGBTAlliance

Y

Y

@MartinAlpin

Y

@IDScUK
@TheIET
@guardian

Y

@librarianklok

Y

@frenchiemanny
@CILIPinfo
@gerardway

Y

@EdgarKlusa

Y

@EuropeUnion
@TheEconomist
@HarvardBiz

Y

@annapajak_

Y

@EU_Comission
@EU_Eurostat
@MarkWarnes2

Y

@ARU_Networking

Y

@ChelmsCouncil
@Cisco
@Mashable

Y

@jrsvensson

Y

@aurorawatchuk
@BEAUTIFULPlCS
@oncologytube

Y

@sarahalle88

Y

@ARUaccom
@ARUenvironment
@UB_UK

Y

@holly_bopp

Y

Y

@Connect_to_Omair

Y

@FST_Placements Y  @PlacementsUK
@Gradcracker
@RateMyPlacement

Y

Y

Please let me know if you think I’ve missed anything – I’ll just claim a senior moment. Some of you who have joined late haven’t complete Day 1 so you aren’t on this table yet – I’ll add you you when you’ve posted.

Don’t worry if you still need to fill in the table, though – there’s plenty of time to catch up!

Happy tweeting!