Tenth Day of #ARU10DoT: The Past and the Future

Twitter is ephemeral. Tweets are short, throwaway observations, which capture the present moment, flow past quickly and are succeeded by more recent and relevant ones. We’ve looked at a way to favourite tweets, and to bookmark the URLs they may contain, but once you’ve done this, why would you want to keep a tweet? Why would you want to tweet in advance, rather than in the moment?

The Past

You can scroll through your last few thousand tweets or so (which might cover quite a span of time, depending on how prolific you are) but searching and looking at hashtags won’t take you back very far, only a few days. And yet… although finding past tweets might be difficult, they can come back to haunt you. If you want to find a tweet, it might be quite tricky, and yet if you want a tweet to disappear, someone may be able to dig it up!

Deleting Tweets

Let’s look first at deleting. You can delete one of your own tweets, by hovering over it and using the option that appears below next to ‘reply’, ‘retweet’, etc. If you make a mistake in a tweet, it might be less confusing to send another tweet with a correction rather than delete one that people may already have seen. If you tweet something you shouldn’t… well, don’t! However, you can’t delete someone else’s tweets, so if they’ve already retweeted you, taken a screenshot, or archived the tweet using some of the options below, it might be too late!

But what if you want to keep tweets, either your own or someone else’s? Why might you want to do this?

  • Perhaps a discussion on Twitter helped you to think something through, and you want to keep the discussion so you can work it up into a blog post, or integrate it into a chapter or article later
  • Maybe there was a good twitter ‘backchannel’ of live-tweeting at a conference or other event, which you want to preserve either for yourself or others
  • Perhaps you want to preserve a selection of good advice or observations on a topic, when you ‘crowdsourced’ – asked for suggestions on Twitter and got some great responses. You might want to keep and share them with others.

Tweet URLs

You can save a link to individual tweets. Each tweet has its own URL. To find this, click on the down arrow and select ‘Copy link to Tweet’ from the list of options:

Twitter will confirm that the link has been copied to the clipboard:

Alternatively you can click on the tweet which will open a new tab/window for that single tweet which contains the URL. You can copy and paste this URL, or save it, bookmark it, embed it in a website, or email it to people.

However, this might only be a convenient way to present tweets in some circumstances.

Your Twitter Archive

If you want a copy of all your tweets, then Twitter can send you an archive of everything you’ve tweeted. Click on the gear icon, and select ‘Settings’. In your ‘Account’ page, scroll down to the bottom where you will see an option to download your archive:

 

Storify

However, one of the nicest ways to keep tweets, especially for others, is a third party application called Storify. Storify is the tool which makes a narrative overview of tweets and other social media by linking to content on the web, including tweets, websites and blogs, Facebook posts, YouTube videos, or photos on Flickr. You can search for content, drag and drop it into a linear narrative, add some comments to contextualise it, and publish it on the web or share the URL. You are linking to the original source, rather than taking the content, so it doesn’t breach copyright. It automatically notifies people whose content you have used in this way, so if they object to your use, you can edit out their material (all the material visible to Storify is publicly visible anyway).

Storify is a really nice way to create and share a summary of tweets and other online material around an event or discussion, such as a conference, blog or livechat. Storify is the tool I used to create a summary of the first week of #ARU10DoT on Day Five.

The Future

And what about future tweets?

You can schedule tweets to send themselves automatically later on. You can’t do this from Twitter itself, but will need to use one of the additional apps mentioned in Days Eight and Nine, so you may wish to leave this topic for later if you want to consolidate the basics first.

Although Twitter is a medium which captures the moment, there are several reasons why you might want to schedule tweets for a later time.

  • If your following contains people in a different time zone who are most likely to be online in the middle of the night, and you want to catch their attention
  • If you have collected a lot of links you want to share, but don’t want to overwhelm your followers with lots of tweets at once
  • If you want to tweet repeated information, updates or reminders, perhaps about an event you’re organising, a blog or article you’ve written or a deadline for a job or funding opportunity, without having to remember to do it (I’ve made use of this frequently throughout this programme!)
  • If you’re away or busy but want to keep some presence on Twitter

You can schedule tweets from both Tweetdeck and Hootsuite. To schedule a tweet in Tweetdeck, for example, write a tweet as normal, and then click on ‘Schedule Tweet’. This brings up a small calendar, where you can choose the time and date when you want your tweet to be sent:

If you don’t use Tweetdeck or Hootsuite, there are other apps which only schedule tweets. You might try, for example, Futuretweets or Twuffer or also Buffer (which works for other social media too). You can sign in with Twitter (or Facebook, or LinkedIn), and it will ask you for permission to access your Twitter feed. Once signed in, it will ask you what you want to share. Type in a tweet, and click ‘schedule’ or ‘buffer’. You will want to go to the ‘Schedule’ tab and set the time zone, and the day and time you want to tweet!

There’s quite a bit there to play with! Well, that’s the last of our Ten Days of Twitter, but don’t worry if you’re still catching up – so are others, and the conversation will be continuing on #ARU10DoT for quite some time, I hope! You might like to keep an eye on the course hashtag and support academic colleagues as they learn how to use Twitter. I hope you’ve found the course useful, and thanks for joining in! Keep tweeting!


Digital Badge

See the Digital Badges tab at the top of the screen for more information.

Activity:  Today’s Digital Badge activity is to complete the Satisfaction Survey.

OR (if you think that’s just too cheeky!)

Post a 100-word reflective summary of your experience of the course and whether it has had any impact on your practice.


But…

If you’ve experimented with Twitter and decided it’s not for you, then I hope we’ve helped you come to a better understanding of what it is, and a well informed decision on whether to use it or not. If you now want to delete your account, it’s easy to do so. We encourage you to keep your digital footprint tidy!

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Digital Badge Update Week 2

Congratulations to everyone who has completed all ten tasks!

@liama_llama, @mrshannahunt, @jrsvensson, @EdgarKlusa, @nicmil75, @MartinAlpin, @FST_Placements, and @JenLLittle

Your digital badges are guaranteed and will be with you shortly (see below).

Congratulations, too, to the Week 1 completers:

@sarah_elsegood, @richardhayward7, @sarahalle88, @SparklyBooks, @annapajak_, @librarianklok, @ARU_Networking, and @ARU_ARITI

Halfway there (or more!).

 

Week 1 outstanding tasks:

  Day 1: Username Day 2: Joining in Day 3: Following People Day 4: @messages Day 5: Retweets
@holly_bopp Y Y 1 / 3
@Connect_to_Omair Y 2 / 3
Janet Sinclair-Hilton

 

Week 2 outstanding tasks:

Handle Day 6: Hashtags Day 7: Pictures Day 8: Managing People Day 9 :Managing Information Day 10: Evaluation
@sarah_elsegood
@richardhayward7 #WeNurses Y
@holly_bopp #Optometryhour
@Connect_to_Omair #internetofthings  Y Y Y Y
@sarahalle88 #wednesdaymotivation Y Y
@SparklyBooks #uklibchat Y
@annapajak_
@librarianklok #TuesdayMotivation Y
@ARU_Networking
@ARU_ARITI Y Y
@HiltoJanet Y Y Y

If you believe that you have completed any of the outstanding tasks, please contact me and let me know where I can find the missing posts (if you can provide me with a screenshot this will speed things up!)

 

Don’t Panic!

Don’t worry if you haven’t completed all the daily tasks yet – there’s still time!

All tasks must be completed by 5pm on Friday 31st March. This allows an additional two weeks for participants who are unable to finish the course while it ran.

Digital Badges will be issued automatically by Wednesday 5th April. If you do not receive a Digital Badge but think you are entitled to one, please contact Mark Warnes.

#ARU10DoT begins again on Monday 6th March (NEW! Digital Badge version)

It’s nearly time for the next iteration of #ARU10DoT – Ten Days of Twitter for Anglia Ruskin! If you’re new to Twitter and would like to explore its use in your professional activities, if you missed parts of the previous iteration and want to review and brush up what we covered, or if you’re an experienced tweeter and just want to support colleagues who are new to Twitter and welcome them to the community, then join us on Monday 6th March for ten days of exploring Twitter and building your professional network! We’ll be focusing on building an ongoing community with twitter chats and hashtags, to explore the role of social media generally in learning and teaching in higher education.

To find out more about the programme, how it works and what it will cover, see the tabs across the top of the page. If you’d like to take part, please register with us and subscribe to this blog by entering your email address in the box to the left of this post and clicking the ‘Follow’ button. You will then receive an email alert for each day’s post (or you could bookmark the page and check each day).

For the first time you can qualify for a Digital Badge for Twitter. To receive your badge you must complete a small activity every day, either on this Blog, or on Twitter, or both!

We look forward to seeing you on 6th March for Ten Days of Tweeting!

 

 

Week One of #ARU10DoT

We’re halfway through the Ten Days of Twitter – I’m really glad so many of you have joined us, and hope you’re finding it useful and fun! Thanks for all your participation. I’ve made several new acquaintances on Twitter, and will be following you for all your updates and information!

I’ve been curating the week’s tweets as we went along, and created this overview of the first five days of Twitter. We’ll find out how to do this later next week. For now, click on the link to view the conversations and discussions, and see quite how far we’ve come together!

View the story ‘#ARU10DoT Ten Days of Twitter at ARU (December 2016)’ on Storify

If you’re following along but haven’t tweeted yet, or if you’ve only just found the programme, it’s not too late to join us! Send me a message as in Day 2 with my name @markwarnes2 and the hashtag #ARU10DoT, and I’ll add you to the list of participants on Twitter that we can all view (see Day 3), to see who else is participating.

Have a great weekend, keep tweeting, and I’ll see you on Monday for Day 6!

Third Day of #ARU10DoT: Following people

You’ve sent your first tweets, creating interesting and engaging content for your potential followers. The other side to Twitter, of course, is the stream of information brought to you by the people you follow. And if you follow people, chances are they will take a look at your profile and decide to follow you in return (which is why setting up a profile with some engaging tweets first was important!).

One of the key features of Twitter is that unlike other platforms, such as Facebook or LinkedIn, following is not necessarily reciprocal – the people you follow may not be the people who follow you (although they might be!). There is no obligation to follow someone just because they follow you. Some people have a more-or-less even match of followers and following; others follow lots of people but don’t tweet much themselves and therefore don’t have many followers; and some tweeters, usually very well-known people or institutions, may have a large number of followers as they tweet a lot but don’t actually follow as many people, using Twitter more as a broadcast medium to get their message out there.

As an individual professional, you’re probably going to get the most benefit in the first instance for the first option, having roughly the same number of followers and following. Twitter works best as a dialogue, and this won’t happen if you’re doing all the talking, or have no one to talk to! This is true even for those tweeting in an official capacity on behalf of their department or research group, although they may have more followers than people they follow, it’s still useful to follow some people, services or institutions so you have other useful information to pass on as well as just promoting your own interests. And following people will give you a sense of how it’s done when you send your own tweets.

How many people you follow is up to you, although perhaps 100 is a good number to aim for (not all today!), to ensure a useful stream of content. Think about what sort of information you want access to, and what sorts of tweeters are likely to offer it (see the list below for some suggestions). It is an organic process and will take time to build up, and don’t forget that you can always unfollow people if the content they tweet is not useful to you! The ‘follow’ button will simply turn to ‘unfollow’, giving you this option. There are ways to find out if you’ve been unfollowed, but generally people don’t bother to check!

To follow someone, simply click on their profile (their name or picture) and click the ‘Follow’ button below their details:

16-12-day-03-01So how do you find people to follow? When you first sign up to Twitter, it will suggest people for you to follow, or invite you to search for names or keywords, but this can be a bit hit and miss. Some people give up at this point, thinking that it’s all pop stars and people tweeting about their breakfast!

Alternatively, you could mute certain people (some people post huge numbers of tweets which can swamp your feed) and occasionally visit their profile to catch up on their tweets. In some cases this is preferable to completely unfollowing them. To mute someone, simply click on their profile, click the gear wheel, and select ‘Mute’.

16-12-day-03-02At this point, it might be useful to know who else is participating in the programme, so I’ve compiled a list of everyone who sent the tweet I suggested yesterday, so you can find and follow each other! The list also includes participants from the previous versions of the programme, and other ARU tweeters.

Here are eight more suggestions (not exhaustive!) to build a useful feed of information that might work well for you as an academic.

  1. ‘Celebrity’ academics and media dons Following well-known people and commentators in academia will give you some ideas of how to build your profile and impact, as well as offering commentary on education policy, news on developments in Higher Education, access to their own network of followers and interesting material to retweet to your followers. You could follow Education researchers such as Tara Brabazon or academics such as Athene Donald, Brian Cox, Alice Roberts, or Mary Beard, who write on academia and academic impact more broadly.
  2. Professional Bodies For updates about events, news, policy, or funding opportunities, your professional body will be very useful. Try for example the Institute or College representing your discipline (for example, The Royal Society, Royal College of Nursing, Chartered Management Institute or British Academy. There are also general Higher Education organisations such as the Higher Education Academy or its relevant subject centres which have a Twitter presence. You can also follow specific universities’ research institutes if they have twitter feeds, such as our own CoDE.
  3. Funding Bodies For calls for funding and other news, follow bodies such as the Research Councils UK (@research_uk), the individual councils or bodies such as the EPSRC, AHRC, ESRC or JISC
  4. Academic and Professional Press Education press such as @TimesHigherEd, @InsideHigherEd or @gdnHigherEd will give you access to general HE news stories which may interest you or your followers. Discipline specific publications such as New Scientist, Nursing Times or the Economist also have their own Twitter feeds, and many academic journals and publishers too, such as the various Nature journals such as NatureChemistry, or NatureMedicine.

Following individual journalists too might be a way to hear about interesting stories or even raise your own profile in the press. Many journals also have their own Twitter accounts which they may use to interact with potential contributors or interviewees.

  1. Colleagues in your discipline Following other colleagues in your field on Twitter is a fantastic way to network. Search for people you know or have heard of to see if they have a Twitter account, both senior and more junior academics. Search by name or by keyword, or import contacts from your LinkedIn account, or from your email account, especially JISCmail lists. Following the ‘backchannel’ of tweets around large annual conferences are a good way to find out who’s on twitter.
  2. Academic mentors There are several academic bloggers and tweeters who create a supportive community for other academic professionals and research students, who have really useful advice and experiences to share on the various aspects of being or becoming an academic, from writing and publication to managing your career. Useful advice to pass on to your students, and possibly useful for you too. You could try jobs.ac.uk for career advice or follow @thesiswhisperer, @researchwhisperer, @ECRchat, @ThomsonPat, @NetworkedRes @earlycareerblog and even @phdcomics Do you know of any others?
  3. Public Engagement and Impact Following the university’s marketing and public engagement team and other researchers interested in impact will help you be aware of events which you might volunteer for, or interesting ways to present research to other audiences. Follow ARU’s official twitter feed. Try also the Festival of Ideas, Cambridge Science Festival or NakedScientists. You could also follow commentators such as Ben Goldacre or Simon Singh.
  4. Associated services and professionals There are lots of people on Twitter who can offer you useful information, but aren’t in your profession. Follow librarians, disability advisers, employability advisers, learning technologists and researchers, learning and staff developers… all useful people to learn from and collaborate with, and stay in touch with what’s happening around the university! Follow Anglia Learning and Teaching, The Library, Student Services, The Student Union, International Students team, Employability or Estates.
  5. Policy makers If you’re interested in government education policy, you could always follow individual politicians, the Government department for Education, WONKHE or the select committees for Business, Information and Skills or Education. You could also follow bodies such as the QAA, HEFCE, Sutton Trust or HESA.
  6. Industry and other sectors To keep an eye on developments in the sector, possible future impacts and applications of your research, or developments which might affect what you’re working on, you could follow some of the professional bodies or companies which represent the types of sector related to your research. If you’re interested in UK Government policy on science, you could follow for example individual politicians and ministers, or the relevant Select Committees e.g. Science or Health (or the equivalent in other countries).

Twitter is partly about the information you tweet, but also about the information you gain from the people you follow. Spend some time reading your twitter feed to see what comes up!

How to grow your Twitter feed from here:

Twitter will suggest people for you to follow based on who you’re currently following. This can be a bit random at first, as you’re not following many people so there’s nothing for its algorithm to work on. There are other ways to add people to your Twitter feed:

Snowball – look at the profile of the people you’re following – who do they follow, and who else is following them? You can see who’s following you, or anyone else, by going to your or their profile, and clicking on ‘followers’.

16-12-day-03-03Retweets – people you follow will retweet things they think might be of interest to others. Keep an eye out for interesting retweets from accounts you don’t yet follow, and add them. We’ll cover retweeting in future Days.

Hashtags – especially around livechats or livetweeted events such as conferences. Joining a discussion around a hashtag is a good way to find more people interested in that topic or event. We’ll also cover hashtags in future Days.

#FF or #FollowFriday – this a convention on Twitter that on Fridays where you tweet the names of people you think are worth following. Watch out for these, or tweet your followers and ask them for recommendations!

Follows – you will be notified when new people follow you – look at their profile to see if they are someone you want to follow back. If you suspect one of your new followers is spam, you can ‘block’ them using the gear icon next to the ‘Follow’ button, and selecting ‘block’. It’s as well to do this, especially as people may be looking through your followers for ideas of who to follow, and it doesn’t look good if lots of your followers are spam!

So – go find some people to follow, and in spare moments through the day, watch the feed of tweets and information they’re sending. If you find any other interesting people you think others should follow, let us know! Remember to keep an eye out for tweets from @ARU10DoT!

 

#ARU10DoT begins again on Monday 5th December

image1EDIT – Registration link updated!

It’s nearly time for the next iteration of #ARU10DoT – Ten Days of Twitter for Anglia Ruskin! If you’re new to Twitter and would like to explore its use in your professional activities, if you missed parts of the previous iteration and want to review and brush up what we covered, or if you’re an experienced tweeter and just want to support colleagues who are new to Twitter and welcome them to the community, then join us on Monday 5th December for ten days of exploring Twitter and building your professional network! We’ll be focusing on building an ongoing community with twitter chats and hashtags, to explore the role of social media generally in learning and teaching in higher education.

To find out more about the programme, how it works and what it will cover, see the tabs across the top of the page. If you’d like to take part, please register with us and subscribe to this blog by entering your email address in the box to the left of this post and clicking the ‘Follow’ button. You will then receive an email alert for each day’s post (or you could bookmark the page and check each day).

We look forward to seeing you on 5th December for Ten Days of Tweeting!

 

 

Getting ready for #ARU10DoT launch on Monday!

Ten Days of Twitter for Anglia Ruskin starts on Monday, and I’m really looking forward to meeting more colleagues online, exploring Twitter and joining in the conversations. I’ve found it an invaluable way to share information and resources with others and even discuss matters at quite some length, given the 140 character limit! I hope you find it a positive experience too.

If you’d like to join us, then please register on the Anglia Learning and Teaching website.

We’ll be going at a manageable pace – one small aspect of Twitter each day, starting with setting up your account effectively on Day One – and I hope none of the Days will need any more than about ten minutes for you to cover the basics. We’re all busy people, and Twitter should suit the fast pace of our work, not hinder it! If you get a day or so behind, don’t worry though, it’s easy to catch up when you have time, the blog posts will all still be there, and we’ll still be around on Twitter to say hi! If you have time, there are some extras to explore, especially in the later days, and I hope you will also spend a little time each day engaging with your Twitter feed, interacting with your new followers and taking part in Twitter chats – it will be worth investing a little extra time if you’re able to!

If you’re already on Twitter, then you may well know much of what we’ll be covering already. We’ll be starting right from scratch with Twitter, but even if it’s familiar stuff to you, I hope you’ll be following the hashtag #ARU10DoT and supporting your newly hatched colleagues by retweeting and replying to their tweets! There may even be a few tips which will be useful to you, you never know!

If you have any questions, do leave them in the comments!

See you online on Monday for the First Day of Twitter!

Mark @markwarnes2